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Dominica weekly is a personal weblog about the nature island of Dominica.

Archive for the ‘Dominica Dining’


codfish bulijaw

Aside from the island’s nature, the people of Dominica may be proud of their cuisine, which is very attractive for the tourists.

Even if tourists travel strictly for sightseeing and activities, they will never deny a possibility to try local foods and drinks, unless those fit their dislikes or restrictions

This does not result from their habitude but from the opposite. The fact may be perfectly explained by ordinary human curiosity combined with travelers’ lack of the stay-at-home lifestyle — and thus fewer food preferences.

To fully understand a cuisine you don’t have to eat all the possible dishes it can offer to you. What is necessary, then? Learning its background.

Dominica’s cuisine’s diversity derives from the location and the culture. The location factors include the environment, the climate, and the structure of the island. The cultural factors include the customs, the history and the different influences.

The cuisine of Dominica is kind of European. What you can find in the Great Britain or in the United States, is what you can find in Dominica. When it comes to specific things, such as cucumbers, it can even be popular. But still, I said “kind of”. In general, the cuisine is independent, and its dishes are unique.

When talking about a cuisine, the first question risen up is, “What can their nature give?” That’s perfectly logical, because if locals can’t easily get some plant or animal, it’s not likely to become a part of a national dish.

 Green seasoningPhotos from “Dominica Food and Drink” guide

If you expect the cuisine of Dominica consist of tropical fruits and vegetables, you are right (unless you think they are its sole components), they are widespread and not expensive. You can try Caribbean dishes whose ingredients are such fruits as bananas, breadfruits, avocados and many others. The dishes are not just exotic, they are very tasty and nutritious. And if you have them at a restaurant, they are going to be authentic. Restaurants are held by households, and all the dishes are homemade. This does not have any effect on the meals as nutrients, but homemade dishes look nicer and taste better.

If you are not a vegan, don’t forget Dominica can offer plenty of seafood. It’s an island, remember? Islands are typically surrounded by seas, and that’s good. Plus, it’s a large island with lakes and rivers. I think you ought to know that, just in case you don’t like lobsters, but crayfish makes you forget about everything except for your hunger.

Meat courses are also a part of the national cuisine. Have you ever tried a properly cooked opossum? It’s delicious. What about agoutis? Adventure novels of the XIX century advertised them a lot, and here is your chance to try them for yourself. Best time for eating them lasts from October to November.

What is Dominica? For some people, it’s the best place to see the nature. For some people it’s the best people to try the nature. For some people, it’s the best place to accept what nature can give you. And Dominica’s cuisine combines these.

For more information about Dominica’s delicious local dishes visit foodanddrink.Dominica facebook page.

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Calabash Restaurant in Calibishie, Dominca

Calibishie has a wonderful new place to dine out, the Calabash Restaurant. It’s conveniently located in a real beauty spot, moderately priced, and serves wonderful food. The phone number is 445-8438.

The Calabash Restaurant has an extensive menu featuring beef, pork, seafood (both fish and shellfish) and chicken in delightful preparations and available as both starters and entrees. And the Calabash offers nice deserts and brews a fine after-dinner coffee.

The restaurant has a well-stocked bar and offers indoor and al fresco dining, the former on the ground floor adjoining the bar and the latter on a first floor deck.

Tables on both levels are available overlooking Calibishie Bay, a beautiful view at any time. On clear days the fine ambience view includes Calibishie’s famed “Devil’s Gate and Red Rocks, the bay and reef, and the islands of Guadeloupe, des Saintes and Marie-Gallante.

the-calabash-restaurant

By night the restaurant floodlights the bay on its shore and one can enjoy twinkling lights on Marie-Gallant and/or the heavenly light of the moon, planets, stars and Milky Way while dining. Reservations aren’t required but a call a day or two in advance can secure menu choices.

No mention of the Calabash Restaurant would be complete without compliments to the staff and the fine service provided. The Calabash Restaurant is very easy to find. Coming from Portsmouth on the main road, look to the left about 150 yards after passing the school. It’s directly on the bay in the refurbished former Domcan’s Restaurant building. Make a point of visiting for a great meal.

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Recently while riding the bus to work, I overheard someone discussing the benefits of being a vegetarian. One thing I have notice when people who are vegans, tell other people that they are vegetarians often the first question that comes out their mouth is “OK, so where do you get you protein?

As soon as I hear this question, I know immediately know that this is someone who doesn’t know much about plants. The idea that plant foods are somehow not enough to sustain the body is nothing but a myth.

Plant foods are generally abundant in protein. For example, lettuce gets 34% of its calories from protein, and broccoli gets 45% of its calories from protein. Spinach is 49%. Cauliflower is 40%. Celery is 21%. Beans range from 23% to 54% depending on the variety. Grains are 8% to 31%. Nuts and seeds are 8% to 21%. Fruits are the lowest at around 5-8% on average.

The human body can only suffer from protein deficiency, if you have seriously restrict total calories (i.e. starve yourself), or you’d have to eat a really messed up, unbalanced diet like nothing but low protein junk foods and certain fruits.

So let’s kill the great myth that plant foods don’t have sufficient proteins to sustain the human body. Personally, I’ve never met anyone suffering from protein deficiency in Dominica, vegan or otherwise. The great risk here (in the Caribbean) is over-consumption of protein… yes it’s possible!

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