Dominica Passport | Caribbean Recipes | Dominica Photos | Classified Ads | Search Jobs | Advertise here!

Experience Dominica – The Nature Island: Dominica Vacations | Exotic Vacations | Honeymoon Destination

Dominica weekly is a personal weblog about the nature island of Dominica.


time-waits-for-no-man.jpg
Photo by:Ladygoth

As technology improves, everyday many Dominicans are bombarded with messages and it seems to be growing at the steady rate. Every day there are new and improved ways to interrupt our work. Between e-mail, internet, fax, and mobile phones, we have entered the age of information overload. Unlike cities like Tokyo and Sillicon Valley, Dominica is still at a primitive stage when it comes to information technology. If you look around you can see the signs. For example lets take a look at cell phones before they use only to make calls – now there are cell phones which allows you to surf the internet, send email, take pictures,etc.

Hear me out; before you start pelting out. The information age brought with it many advantages to the workplace – transactions that took weeks to finalize can be done in a matter of seconds. Likewise, we must also recognize the disadvantages the information age brought to our daily work ethics.

Few companies in Dominica have recognized this disparity and have implemented various types of time management training programs. Even so, you need to come up with a well thought out plan in order to meet your goals. Luckily there are several things you can do to make the most of your day, get things done, and still have time left over to relax.

One of the best things you can do to work smarter is to manage your incoming communications. Separate your work and personal e-mail accounts, and only respond to your work-related messages while you are in your office. Save the personal messages for later. Schedule blocks of time in your calendar specifically for this task, put a time limit on it, and stick to it.

Schedule your important phone calls as well. Allow sufficient time to contact your clients, but do (or try) not get entangled with personal conversations. Keep your phone time to a minimum, but do not be short or rude. Get a phone with caller I.D. and an answering machine, and put all non-essential calls on ignore.

Working smarter will help you keep up with the demands of the workplace while still maintaining a good work life balance and keeps you out of trouble 😀 .

Share this Dominica article with your friends:

Facebook Twitter Google Buzz Google Bookmarks Digg Reddit delicious Technorati Slashdot Yahoo My Web

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our RSS feed!

RSS feed | Trackback URI

2 Comments »

Comment by Dan
2008-02-15 23:29:53

So you want to manage your time? I found this on the Reuters Web site:

Precision clock traps atoms in light to keep time
Fri Feb 15, 2008 3:58pm EST

By Julie Steenhuysen

CHICAGO (Reuters) – U.S. physicists have made a clock so accurate it will neither gain nor lose even a second in more than 200 million years, a finding sure to please even the most punctually minded.

The clock, described in the Friday issue of the journal Science, outperforms the official atomic clock used by the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology, which promises to keep accurate time down to the second for 80 million years.

The new atomic clock is vying for the title of world’s most accurate with another experimental clock developed in the same lab at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, a collaboration between NIST and the University of Colorado in Boulder.

“These clocks are improving so rapidly that it is impossible to tell which one will be the best,” said Tom 0’Brian, head of the Time and Frequency Division at NIST.

Such highly precise clocks are critical for deep space navigation, where even a slight error can make or break a space mission.

The secret to making an extremely accurate clock is speeding up how fast it ticks. “If you make a mistake, you can know about that mistake very fast,” said Jun Ye, who developed the atomic clock at JILA.

Ye’s clock has 430 trillion “ticks” per second.

Its pendulum uses thousands of strontium atoms suspended in grids of laser light. This allows the researchers to trap the atoms and measure the movement of energy inside.

“Essentially, we are probing the energy structure of the atom. We are probing how electrons make transitions between a set of energy levels,” Ye said in a telephone interview.

“This is the time scale that was made by the universe. It is very stable.”

To test his clock’s accuracy, Ye and colleagues compared it with another optical atomic clock — this one measuring calcium atoms. This calcium clock is highly stable only over short periods of time, so the researchers had to make fast measurements for their comparisons.

Next Ye wants to take on a clock that measures a single ion, or charged particle, of mercury. This clock, also developed at JILA, was accurate to about 1 second in 400 million years in 2006. Because Ye’s clock measures thousands of atoms at once, it produces stronger signals, something Ye thinks may give him an edge.

“These clocks are among the best in the world,” John Lowe, leader of the atomic standards group at NIST, said in a telephone interview. “Longer-term experiments will prove which of these clocks may end up becoming the next standard of international agreement.”

Ye said pushing for ever more accurate clocks will allow physicists to test some of the basic questions about the nature of the universe.

It also can be used to synchronize telecommunications networks and might some day lead to things like hands-free driving in satellite-guided cars.

“If we can navigate a vehicle on Mars and ask it to settle down on a particular runway, I’m sure we can navigate all the cars on Earth with satellites,” Ye said.

(Editing by Maggie Fox and Jackie Frank)

© Reuters 2007. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Reuters content, including by caching, framing or similar means, is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters. Reuters and the Reuters sphere logo are registered trademarks and trademarks of the Reuters group of companies around the world.

 
Comment by Jan
2008-07-22 03:36:11

Time management is very essential in our daily activities. This will smoothly accomplish our task and not just the task for that day but also for a long-term goals.

 
Name (required)
E-mail (required - never shown publicly)
URI
Your Comment (smaller size | larger size)
You may use <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong> in your comment.

Trackback responses to this post




Business Key Top Sites